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  • The Energy Institute recently updated its guidance for the design and operation of petrol vapour emission controls at distribution terminals to service stations, coinciding with 25 years of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions regulations covering this sector in the UK.

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • International political transformation and international goodwill are required for energy development in Sudan and South Sudan. Maria Kielmas reports.

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • The global energy system and the energy professionals that keep it running are playing a crucial role in the battle against the Covid-19 pandemic, maintaining the vital energy supply network on which most of us, including our hospitals and key workers, rely. Our thoughts are with all those impacted ...

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Issue

  • China’s crude stock (including strategic and commercial petroleum reserves) could reach 1.15bn barrels in 2020, equivalent to 83 days of oil demand, according to the latest analysis from Wood Mackenzie.‘Major crude oil importers such as China have been known to build their strategic reserves when pr...

    • Availability: Online
    • Record type: News Item

  • For information on methane emissions related to coal, see Energy Insight - Methane Emissions reduction – Part 2 – Coal Why is methane a problem for the climate?Methane (CH4) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere (after water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO2)). Any metha...

    • Availability: Online
    • Record type: Energy Insight

  • Last month we highlighted the variety of routes the oil and gas sector is taking in the drive to a low carbon future. This second article examines the implications of the energy transition for three major oil and gas providers – Repsol, ADNOC and BP – in relation to the key areas of renewables devel...

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • Industrial processes will prove difficult to decarbonise, which is why policymakers have long talked about trapping and storing the carbon dioxide they emit. Could this CO2 be sold and used elsewhere? Robert Stokes investigates.

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • In the first of several articles highlighting the Energy Institute’s international footprint, Energy World asked Hassen Bali of ion Ventures to describe the role that renewables with energy storage can play in projects from the UK to Asia Pacific.

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • In the first of several articles highlighting the Energy Institute’s international footprint, Energy World asked Hassen Bali of ion Ventures to describe the role that renewables with energy storage can play in projects from the UK to Asia Pacific.

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Article

  • This month’s issue begins with the second of a two-part article looking at the variety of routes being taken by the oil and gas sector in the drive to a low carbon future, with a particular focus on the activities of Repsol, ADNOC and BP. Keeping to the energy transition theme, we also highlight how...

    • Availability: In the library|Online
    • Record type: Issue

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